Photography Tips

Aurora HDR 2019 Review

When I first started using Aurora back in 2017 it really felt like the beginning of something awesome. Like the baby alien that just burst out of Kanes chest in the first Alien movie, it took off running doing all these mysterious things behind the scenes.

The little creature continued to grow while occasionally popping out for an update here and there. It was exciting and still powerful, but we only got to see hints of what this beast would become. Finally, with the launch of Aurora HDR 2019, it’s true form has been revealed as the perfect landscape devouring monster.

Depth of Field Calculator | With 35mm Equivalency

  10.09.2018   Alik   Blog   No comments

The depth of field calculator allows you to find the depth of field of any aperture of any lens at any distance. The depth of field calculator also includes a 35mm equivalency calculation so you can see equivalent lens crop and depth of a given aperture on smaller or larger sensor cameras compared to full frame 35mm. 

How To Protect Your Lenses From Moisture

If you live in a humid climate, you know how quickly mold and fungus can consume everything. The same is true of your lenses and camera gear. 

Humidity is a killer, feeding any mold spores that have made their way into lenses, creating fuzzy spots that will ruin your glass. I’ve even had it happen to one of my lenses when living in Los Angeles and it’s not even that humid there.

Here are some really cool and inexpensive tricks to protect your lenses from humidity.

Macphun Luminar Review | You Don’t Want To Miss This One

I’ve spent years learning all the crazy tricks in Photoshop for Landscape photography, building actions, buying plugins, etc. Then Macphun comes around and simplifies all that complicated workflow with a couple of sliders and a handful of filters. Brilliant!

Mastering Manual Focus | Fujifilm XT2

  30.07.2017   Alik   Blog   5 Comments

Lately I’ve been shooting quite a bit with the Helios 44-2 and other old vintage m42 manual focus lenses from the 80’s. While shooting with manual lenses takes more time and isn’t always as precise, it’s much more rewarding and you feel like you have complete control of every shot you take. 

Getting Down A New Workflow

  15.06.2017   Alik   Blog   No comments

With the introduction of Aurora HDR into my workflow, editing is getting pretty cool and a lot quicker, but it now means I have to use three different programs (Lightroom,

The Beauty Of Simplicity | Fujifilm X-Pro 2

  31.10.2016   Alik   Blog   No comments

You can spend hundreds, or even thousands on landscape photography tutorials, or . . . you can just shoot with Fujifilm.

Here is all I did to get these results.

Uncompressed vs. Lossless – Fujifilm X-T2

  4.10.2016   Alik   Blog   9 Comments

So now that we have the option to choose with the X-T2 and X-Pro 2, uncompressed versus lossless compressed, the question arises, does shooting with one versus the other actually make a difference? 

An Iridient Developer Workflow Guide

  27.07.2015   Alik   Blog   3 Comments

Do you ever wonder if you’re using the most time efficient workflow?

If you’re a Fujifilm shooter and want to use Iridient Developer as your primary photo processing software, or even if you want to use it as a RAW converter, then have a solid and consistent workflow is not only going to save you a lot of time, but it will also make your photo editing process a lot simpler. 

In this guide I want to share with you the way I use Iridient Developer to process my Fujifilm RAW files and a file structure to help you stay organized.

How To Shoot Better Sun Stars

  24.07.2015   Alik   Uncategorized   No comments

Shot with the Fuji X-T1 and the voigtlander 15mm iii.

A relatively new trend has emerged in the online photography communities over the last few years that involves shooting into the sun or other bright light sources so that the bright light creates star points around it. Also known as sunstars.

The Method

I run across a lot of tutorials and tips of people explaining how to do it. Typical they all say about the same thing, shoot high apertures, anywhere from f16 to f22.

While this does usually work, it’s not always the best practice. I find that shooting at higher apertures on many of our high megapixel cameras has a massive impact on overall image quality due to diffraction.

So what do we do?